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American Foods That Are Banned Elsewhere

on August 4, 2013 | In: Current Affairs, Food and Drink, HIdden Food Additives, News | 1 Comment

If you typically take blog with a side of raw kale and seared grass fed filet, today might be the day to make an exception. It may turn your stomach; it did mine!   

Wake Up Call News, an Alternative Media site that “shares all the big top news from the whole world” and whose mission is to “share The Truth and Wake people Up” had an alarming article about foods that are available to us here in the US but are banned elsewhere.   Citing mercola.com as their source, we see the following horrifying ‘foods’ that are in every day foods, despite being seen as harmful to toxic in other countries.     

Often,when I reference another article, I do my best to edit down to highlight the most significant parts.  It was hard to do so with this piece as I felt nearly all the information provided with each was quite crucial….

From their site:

#1: FARM-RAISED SALMON  Farmed salmon, on the other hand, are raised on a wholly unnatural diet of grains (including genetically engineered varieties), plus a concoction of antibiotics and other drugs and chemicals not shown to be safe for humans

#2: GENETICALLY ENGINEERED PAPAYA 

Most Hawaiian papaya is now genetically engineered to be resistant to ringspot virus. Mounting research now shows that animals fed genetically engineered foods, such as corn and soy, suffer a wide range of maladies, including intestinal damage, multiple-organ damage, massive tumors, birth defects, premature death, and near complete sterility by the third generation of offspring. Unfortunately, the gigantic human lab experiment is only about 10 years old, so we are likely decades away from tabulating the human casualties. 

#3: RACTOPAMINE-TAINTED MEAT

The US does not even test for the presence of this drug in meats sold. In animals, ractopamine is linked to reductions in reproductive function, increase of mastitis in dairy herds, and increased death and disability. It’s also known to affect the human cardiovascular system, and is thought to be responsible for hyperactivity, and may cause chromosomal abnormalities and behavioral changes.

#4: FLAME RETARDANT DRINKS

If you live in the US and drink Mountain Dew and some other citrus-flavored sodas and sports drinks, then you are also getting a dose of a synthetic chemical called brominated vegetable oil (BVO), which was originally patented by chemical companies as a flame retardant.
BVO has been shown to bioaccumulate in human tissue and breast milk, and animal studies have found it causes reproductive and behavioral problems in large doses. Bromine is a central nervous system depressant, and a common endocrine disruptor. It’s part of the halide family, a group of elements that includes fluorine, chlorine and iodine. When ingested, bromine competes for the same receptors that are used to capture iodine. This can lead to iodine deficiency, which can have a very detrimental impact on your health. Bromine toxicity can manifest as skin rashes, acne, loss of appetite, fatigue, and cardiac arrhythmias. According to the featured article:
“The FDA has flip-flopped on BVO’s safety originally classifying it as ‘generally recognized as safe’ but reversing that call now defining it as an ‘interim food additive’ a category reserved for possibly questionable substances used in food.”

#5: PROCESSED FOODS CONTAINING ARTIFICIAL FOOD COLORS AND DYES

“Boxed Mac & Cheese, cheddar flavored crackers, Jell-O and many kids’ cereals contain red 40, yellow 5, yellow 6 and/or blue 2, the most popularly-used dyes in the United States. Research has shown this rainbow of additives can cause behavioral problems as well as cancer, birth defects and other health problems in laboratory animals. Red 40 and yellow 6 are also suspected of causing an allergy-like hypersensitivity reaction in children. The Center for Science in the Public Interest reports that some dyes are also “contaminated with known carcinogens.”
In countries where these food colors and dyes are banned, food companies like Kraft employ natural colorants instead, such as paprika extract, beetroot, and annatto. 

#6: ARSENIC-LACED CHICKEN

Arsenic-based drugs are approved for use in animal feed in the US because they make animals grow quicker and make the meat appear pinker (i.e. “fresher”). The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has stated these products are safe because they contain organic arsenic, which is less toxic than the other inorganic form, which is a known carcinogen.
The problem is, scientific reports surfaced stating that the organic arsenic could transform into inorganic arsenic, which has been found in elevated levels in supermarket chickens. The inorganic arsenic also contaminates manure where it can eventually migrate into drinking water and may also be causing heightened arsenic levels in US rice.

#7: BREAD WITH POTASSIUM BROMATE

Bromated flour is “enriched” with potassium bromate. Commercial baking companies claim it makes the dough more elastic and better able to stand up to bread hooks. However, Pepperidge Farm and other successful companies manage to use only unbromated flour without any of these so-called “structural problems.” Studies have linked potassium bromate to kidney and nervous system damage, thyroid problems, gastrointestinal discomfort, and cancer. The International Agency for Research on Cancer classifies potassium bromate as a possible carcinogen.

#8: OLESTRA/OLEAN

Olestra, aka Olean, created by Procter & Gamble, is a calorie- and cholesterol-free fat substitute used in fat-free snacks like chips and French fries. Three years ago, Time Magazine3 named it one of the worst 50 inventions ever, but that hasn’t stopped food companies from using it to satisfy people’s mistaken belief that a fat-free snack is a healthier snack. According to the featured article:
“Not only did a 2011 study from Purdue University conclude rats fed potato chips made with Olean gained weight, there have been several reports of adverse intestinal reactions to the fake fat including diarrhea, cramps and leaky bowels. And because it interferes with the absorption of fat soluble vitamins such as A, D, E and K, the FDA requires these vitamins be added to any product made with Olean or olestra.”

#9 BHA (butylated hydroxyanisole) and BHT (butylated hydroxytoluene) are commonly used preservatives that can be found in breakfast cereal, nut mixes, chewing gum, butter spread, meat, dehydrated potatoes, and beer, just to name a few. BHA is known to cause cancer in rats, and may be a cancer-causing agent in humans as well. In fact, according to the US Department of Health and Human Services, National Toxicology Program’s 2011 Report on Carcinogens, BHA “is reasonably anticipated to be a human carcinogen.” It may also trigger allergic reactions and hyperactivity, while BHT can cause organ system toxicity.

Where it’s banned: The UK doesn’t allow BHA in infant foods. BHA and BHT are also banned in parts of the European Union and Japan

#10: MILK AND DAIRY PRODUCTS LACED WITH RBGH

Despite decades of evidence about the dangers of rBGH, the FDA still maintains it’s safe for human consumption and ignores scientific evidence to the contrary. In 1999, the United Nations Safety Agency ruled unanimously not to endorse or set safety standards for rBGH milk, which has effectively resulted in an international ban on US milk.4 The Cancer Prevention Coalition, trying for years to get the use of rBGH by the dairy industry banned, resubmitted a petition to FDA Commissioner Margaret Hamburg, MD, in January 2010.5 Although the FDA stubbornly sticks to its position that milk from rBGH-treated cows is no different than milk from untreated cows, this is just plain false and is not supported by science. The only way to avoid rBGH is to look for products labeled as “rBGH-free” or “No rBGH.”

To me, the most appalling thing is not what these things do to us in terms of poisoning, but that they’re all OK by the FDA.  So what does that tell you about everything else they approve, including prescription drugs?  And how about the ‘approved’ advice that can be doled out in terms of what we should be eating?

Think about where the information is coming from and who benefits and try to adopt the attitude that ‘approved by the FDA’ really doesn’t mean anything in terms of whether something is good for us or might actually make us sick.

Yet one more reason to go Paleo and steer clear from any ‘food’ that is packaged or processed.  Go straight to the source and be confident that you’re procuring clean, safe food for yourself and your family.  Support your local farmers and ranchers who you can get to know on a personal level and develop a trust that their food is actually, truly food.

 

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1 Comment.

  • PtAnderpeet August 4, 2013 at 10:54 am

    Mercola.com is pretty much the antithesis of “valid and reliable.” Did you even check out the insanity that website peddles? This list you posted may or may not be true, but associating it with mercola.com is like linking to an anti-government militia separatist website as a source for political news. Sure, it may be right, may be wrong, but my gut reaction, and that of many others who are familiar with Mercola’s dangerous nonsense, will be that it is more likely to be false, hopelessly biased, and entirely unreliable.

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